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Creating an insecure http4 component in Apache Camel

Recently I was struggling with invoking HTTP endpoints using self-signed certificates using the Apache Camel http4 component. The crux of the problem was the fact these certificates change rapidly and are maintained by other teams. Since this was an internal call only, routed through a VPN I decided  to approach the problem by disabling the certificate check instead of adding the self-signed certificates to a keystore which I normally do in these situations.  So keep in mind, doing this will undermine the security of the TLS connection. And obviously only works with one-way TLS connections.
It was with disabling the certificate checks in the http4 component that I was struggling so I decided to share what I did with you when I eventually found out the solution.
A small note, the example provided in this blogpost is using Apache Camel in combination of CDI. But the solution will work equally well with frameworks like Spring or OSGi Blueprint.
First I created my own instance of the HttpComponent seperating it from the standard http4 component.
public class CustomHttp4Component {

    @Produces
    @Named("insecurehttps4")
    public HttpComponent createCustomHttp4Component() {
       HttpComponent httpComponent = new HttpComponent();

In this custom http4 component we have to do two things. First is to change the Certificate HostnameVerifier so the hostname on the self-signed certificate is not causing an exception.

This is accomplished by setting an instance of the org.apache.http.conn.ssl.AllowAllHostnameVerifier to the http4 component using the setter method setX509HostNameVerifier. Note, the version of Apache Camel I am using (2.17) still requires the now deprecated: org.apache.http.conn.ssl.AllowAllHostnameVerifier newer versions of Apache Camel are using the org.apache.http.conn.ssl.NoopHostnameVerifier.

This unfortunately was not enough to invoke the endpoint, an empty X509TrustManager was also required. It needs to be empty for our purpose to basically omit the certificate validation checks. For this we needed to extend the X509ExtendedTrustManager and override the methods implementing them as “empty”. To set our empty thrustmanager on the http4 component we need to wrap it in a TrustManagersParameters class and wrap this into an SSLParameters class before we can add it to the http4 component.



TrustManagersParameters trustManagersParameters = new TrustManagersParameters();
X509ExtendedTrustManager extendedTrustManager = new InsecureX509TrustManager();
trustManagersParameters.setTrustManager(extendedTrustManager);

SSLContextParameters sslContextParameters = new SSLContextParameters();
sslContextParameters.setTrustManagers(trustManagersParameters);
httpComponent.setSslContextParameters(sslContextParameters);

After this we can use our new insecure http4 component in our Camel routes just as the normal http4 component.
The entire custom http4 component:

package nl.schiphol.api.integration.components;

import org.apache.camel.component.http4.HttpComponent;
import org.apache.camel.util.jsse.SSLContextParameters;
import org.apache.camel.util.jsse.TrustManagersParameters;
import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.AllowAllHostnameVerifier;

import javax.enterprise.inject.Produces;
import javax.inject.Named;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLEngine;
import javax.net.ssl.X509ExtendedTrustManager;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.security.cert.CertificateException;
import java.security.cert.X509Certificate;

public class CustomHttp4Component {

    @Produces
    @Named("insecurehttps4")
    public HttpComponent createCustomHttp4Component() {
        HttpComponent httpComponent = new HttpComponent();

        httpComponent.setX509HostnameVerifier(AllowAllHostnameVerifier.INSTANCE);


        TrustManagersParameters trustManagersParameters = new TrustManagersParameters();
        X509ExtendedTrustManager extendedTrustManager = new InsecureX509TrustManager();
        trustManagersParameters.setTrustManager(extendedTrustManager);

        SSLContextParameters sslContextParameters = new SSLContextParameters();
        sslContextParameters.setTrustManagers(trustManagersParameters);
        httpComponent.setSslContextParameters(sslContextParameters);

        return httpComponent;
    }

    private static class InsecureX509TrustManager extends X509ExtendedTrustManager {
        @Override
        public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s, Socket socket) throws CertificateException {

        }

        @Override
        public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s, Socket socket) throws CertificateException {

        }

        @Override
        public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s, SSLEngine sslEngine) throws CertificateException {

        }

        @Override
        public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s, SSLEngine sslEngine) throws CertificateException {

        }

        @Override
        public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s) throws CertificateException {

        }

        @Override
        public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s) throws CertificateException {

        }

        @Override
        public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
            return new X509Certificate[0];
        }
    }
}

 
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Posted by on 2017-02-17 in Geen categorie

 

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